An hórreo in Galicia

Galicia is blanketed with hórreos (from Latin horreum, granary).   Ever so charming, most older homes here had one, and although rarely in use anymore, people keep them because of nostalgia, aesthetics, and status signaling.  We sat for a while in the spectacular one at Quinta San Amaro in Meaño, which has been converted into a reading room, and where the walls have been replaced with glass.

We liked the one at the Pazo Baión winery, which we toured, and which has been moved to the top of the hill, where it stands,  stately overlooking the vineyards.

Peregrinus has been docked at Villanova de Arousa for a week, waiting for a weather window to sail on South to Portugal.  In the meantime, we rented a car and explored the Rias Baixas, Santiago de Compostela, Pontevedra, and Vigo.  The crenellations on the tower at Pazo (palace) Baion are only 100 years old, added by the nouveau riche Galician guy who went to Argentina, got fabulously rich, and bought the Pazo from the counts who built it before Columbus found the New World.  Leica Typ 114, 9 October 2014.

Peregrinus has been docked at Villanova de Arousa for a week, waiting for a weather window to sail on South to Portugal.  In the meantime, we rented a car and explored the Rias Baixas, Santiago de Compostela, Pontevedra, and Vigo.  The crenellations on the tower at Pazo (palace) Baion are only 100 years old, added by the nouveau riche Galician guy who went to Argentina, got fabulously rich, and bought the Pazo from the counts who built it before Columbus found the New World.  Leica Typ 114, 9 October 2014.