Port-Royal, Nova Scotia

Lieutenant General Timothé Pierre du Guast, Sieur de Monts, established the colony at Port-Royal in 1605, where it remained for the next one-and-half century as capital of Acadia under French rule and as later capital of Nova Scotia under the British, until the founding of Halifax in 1749.  Once the English took over for good, they renamed the town Annapolis Royal, after the Queen.

When this capital was French, the Brits attacked many times; and when it became English, the French attacked no less than six times; in all, thirteen battles were fought in Port-Royal/Annapolis Royal.  In 1629, in particular, it was the Scots under the 1st Earl of Stirling, of Menstrie Castle, who took it from the French for three years.  

And the Scottish called the land New Scotland, and by that name we know it today.

View of the the Rivière du Dauphin, now Annapolis River, and known as "the cradle of Acadian Culture", pictured from Fort Anne at Annapolis Royal.  The fort was originally built by the Scots, and then rebuilt by the French; its final shape as designed by the great Vauban.   The Great Union Flag (1606-1801) is flown over it, in memory of the time the British took over the land.   Peregrinus lies moored just beyond the trees on this picture.

View of the the Rivière du Dauphin, now Annapolis River, and known as "the cradle of Acadian Culture", pictured from Fort Anne at Annapolis Royal.  The fort was originally built by the Scots, and then rebuilt by the French; its final shape as designed by the great Vauban.   The Great Union Flag (1606-1801) is flown over it, in memory of the time the British took over the land.  
Peregrinus lies moored just beyond the trees on this picture.